Signs of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

1 min read

As summer fades into fall and the winter holidays, days become shorter and darker. Often, the commute between home and work or school takes place in darkness. In addition, the holiday season can bring up family conflicts, loneliness, grief, money concerns, or increased use of substances such as alcohol. Some people experience mood changes in response to these seasonal changes. Here are some possible symptoms to take into consideration:

 

  • Sadness or depressed mood
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities (known as anhedonia)
  • Changes in appetite or cravings; weight gain or loss
  • Change in sleep patterns; often too much
  • Decreased energy or increased fatigue despite increased sleep 
  • Increase in purposeless physical activity (e.g., pacing, fidgeting, handwringing) or slowed movements or speech that are observable by others
  • Feelings of guilt, hopelessness, or worthlessness
  • Difficulty thinking, concentrating, or making decisions
  • Thoughts of death or suicide
  • Improvement as spring and summer begin
These symptoms could be a form of depression known as seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. 
At Lifeologie, Jim Ming sees clients in Dallas and Fort Worth who are working on these issues, and many other emotional and mental health concerns. If this sounds like you, please call us at (214) 357-4001 to discuss Lifeologie's counseling services.
 
If you are having suicidal thoughts, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 988 for support and assistance from a trained counselor. If you or a loved one are in immediate danger, call 911.

About Jim Ming

Jim helps clients find solutions for life’s challenges, including adjustment issues, relationships, stress management, depression, grief, and anxiety. Jim uses a humanistic, practical, and action-oriented approach.

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